CIA releases new Watergate material reviving Nixon Articles of Impeachment that have an eerily familiar ring

Harkening back to the secretive and scandalous days of former President Richard Nixon, the CIA released Nixon’s classified President’s Daily Briefs (PDB). At a national security symposium at the Nixon library, CIA Director John Brennan unveiled roughly 2,500 declassified documents, including papers from the Watergate scandal that ultimately forced the 37th president to resign.

WATCH CW6 TV SEGMENT HERE

The PDB documents highlighted intelligence community analysis that the president and his senior policymakers used to access domestic and national security threats.  Among the documents are historical events including the Vietnam War, President Nixon’s trip to China in 1972, OPEC embargo in 1973-74, and the Arab-Israeli War in 1973.

“Today is an opportunity to shed a bit more light on our mission and our history for the benefit of the American people,” CIA Director John Brennan said.  “For several years, CIA information management officers have worked with their counterparts at the National Security Council and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence on the review and declassification of these documents.  Roughly 85 percent of the collection has been declassified and is being made available to the public.”

While not part of the CIA presentation in Yorba Linda, another collection of documents has been released after a Judicial Watch Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit.

In an effort to hide its own misconduct, the CIA kept classified material about a double agent spy they used to keep tabs on the DNC burglars and denied the agent existed to federal prosecutors.

“Working Draft – CIA Watergate History,” is a 155-page study written by John Richards, a CIA officer. The incomplete report remained in the secret vault for decades before unnamed Agency colleagues completed it.

“Even in draft form, the document represents CIA’s fullest narrative treatment of the Watergate affair, which first surfaced publicly in the predawn hours of June 17, 1972. That’s when Washington police, dressed in plain clothes and responding to a call from a private security guard, arrested at gunpoint five burglars inside the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate office complex in Washington,” James Rosen of Fox News wrote. “The arrested men were wearing business suits and rubber gloves and carrying electronic eavesdropping devices. Investigation swiftly revealed that one of them was employed by the president’s re-election campaign committee, and that four of the five boasted past ties to CIA. But one of the arrested men, it turns out, was still on Langley’s payroll at the time of the arrests, and had been feeding information about the break-in team to his CIA case officers the entire time.”

“That CIA mole was Eugenio R. Martinez, a Cuban Bay of Pigs veteran who was recruited to the break-in team by E. Howard Hunt, the legendary former CIA officer and spy novelist who had helped plan the Bay of Pigs operation in the Kennedy era and had gone on to work as a consultant on covert projects at the Nixon White House,” according to the archive.

Of course, the Watergate break-in led to three Articles of Impeachment against President Nixon that sounds eerily similar to the present day trials and tribulations of the Democrat presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

Article 1

In his conduct of the office of President of the United States, Richard M. Nixon, in violation of his constitutional oath faithfully to execute the office of President of the United States and, to the best of his ability, preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States, and in violation of his constitutional duty to take care that the laws be faithfully executed, has prevented, obstructed, and impeded the administration of justice, in that:

On June 17, 1972, and prior thereto, agents of the Committee for the Re-election of the President committed unlawful entry of the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee in Washington, District of Columbia, for the purpose of securing political intelligence. Subsequent thereto, Richard M. Nixon, using the powers of his high office, engaged personally and through his close subordinates and agents, in a course of conduct or plan designed to delay, impede, and obstruct the investigation of such illegal entry; to cover up, conceal and protect those responsible; and to conceal the existence and scope of other unlawful covert activities (emphasis added).

Adopted 27-11 by the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives, at 7.07pm on Saturday, 27th July 1974, in Room 2141 of the Rayburn Office Building, Washington D.C.

Article 2

Using the powers of the office of President of the United States, Richard M. Nixon, in violation of his constitutional oath faithfully to execute the office of President of the United States and, to the best of his ability, preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States, and in disregard of his constitutional duty to take care that the laws be faithfully executed, has repeatedly engaged in conduct violating the constitutional rights of citizens, impairing the due and proper administration of justice and the conduct of lawful inquiries, or contravening the laws governing agencies of the executive branch and the purpose of these agencies (emphasis added).

Adopted 28-10 by the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives.

Article 3

In his conduct of the office of President of the United States, Richard M. Nixon, contrary to his oath faithfully to execute the office of President of the United States and, to the best of his ability, preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States, and in violation of his constitutional duty to take care that the laws be faithfully executed, has failed without lawful cause or excuse to produce papers and things as directed by duly authorized subpoenas issued by the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives on April 11, 1974, May 15, 1974, May 30, 1974, and June 24, 1974, and willfully disobeyed such subpoenas. The subpoenaed papers and things were deemed necessary by the Committee in order to resolve by direct evidence fundamental, factual questions relating to Presidential direction, knowledge or approval of actions demonstrated by other evidence to be substantial grounds for impeachment of the President. In refusing to produce these papers and things Richard M. Nixon, substituting his judgment as to what materials were necessary for the inquiry, interposed the powers of the Presidency against the lawful subpoenas of the House of Representatives, thereby assuming to himself functions and judgments necessary to the exercise of the sole power of impeachment vested by the Constitution in the House of Representatives (emphasis added).

Adopted 21-17 by the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives.

In all of this, Richard M. Nixon has acted in a manner contrary to his trust as President and subversive of constitutional government, to the great prejudice of the cause of law and justice and to the manifest injury of the people of the United States.

Wherefore Richard M. Nixon, by such conduct, warrants impeachment and trial, and removal from office.”

What is that quote about “those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it?”

About thekdreport

Investigative journalist

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: